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New front against Kurds...

How Did the Turkish Peace Process Collapse?

David Barchard Jul 30, 2015

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Turkey’s peace process with the PKK (Kurdistan Workers’ Party) began in the first three months of 2013, after nearly four decades of struggle in which an estimated 40,000 lives were lost.

It ended, finally, when President Recep Tayyip Erdogan formally declared it dead on Tuesday this week. He also indicated that the government now intends to launch prosecutions against the pro-Kurdish Peoples Democracy Party (HDP) and its leader, Selahattin Demirel, less than two months after he and 79 others were elected to parliament by six million voters.

How has something which seemed so hopeful ended in this debacle? The short answer is a spate of murders in eastern Turkey that began when 32 left-wing student activists died in a bomb blast at Suruc on their way to Kobane on 20 July. PKK activists, convinced of a secret alliance between the AKP and ISIL (something which the AKP strongly denies), blamed the Ankara government for the deaths and began to retaliate by killing police. After five soldiers and gendarmes died at the hands of the PKK in quick succession, the patience of the Turkish government was exhausted. Retaliation in the form of repeated airstrikes against PKK targets in southeastern Turkey and northern Iraq followed between Friday night and the early hours of Wednesday.
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Post-Constitutional America, Where Innocence is a Poor Defense

Peter Van Buren Jul 30, 2015

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Rahinah Ibrahim is a slight Malaysian woman who attended Stanford University on a US student visa, majoring in architecture. She was not a political person. Despite this, as part of a post-9/11 sweep directed against Muslims, she was investigated by the FBI. In 2004, while she was still in the US but unbeknownst to her, the FBI sent her name to the no-fly list.

Ibrahim was no threat to anyone, innocent of everything, and ended up on that list only due to a government mistake. Nonetheless, she was not allowed to reenter the US to finish her studies or even attend her trial and speak in her own defense. Her life was derailed by the tangle of national security bureaucracy and pointless “anti-terror” measures that have come to define post-Constitutional America. Here’s what happened, and why it may matter to you.

The No-Fly List

On September 10, 2001, there was no formal no-fly list. Among the many changes pressed on a scared population starting that September 12th were the creation of two such lists: the no-fly list and the selectee list for travelers who were to undergo additional scrutiny when they sought to fly. If you were on the no-fly list itself, as its name indicated, you could not board a flight within the US or one heading out of or into the country. As a flight-ban plan, it would come to extend far beyond America’s borders, since the list was shared with 22 other countries.
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Drivers, Beware: The Costly, Deadly Dangers of Traffic Stops in the American Police State

John W. Whitehead Jul 29, 2015

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Trying to predict the outcome of any encounter with the police is a bit like playing Russian roulette: most of the time you will emerge relatively unscathed, although decidedly poorer and less secure about your rights, but there’s always the chance that an encounter will turn deadly.

The odds weren’t in Walter L. Scott’s favor. Reportedly pulled over for a broken taillight, Scott—unarmed—ran away from the police officer, who pursued and shot him from behind, first with a Taser, then with a gun. Scott was struck five times, “three times in the back, once in the upper buttocks and once in the ear — with at least one bullet entering his heart.”

Samuel Dubose, also unarmed, was pulled over for a missing front license plate. He was reportedly shot in the head after a brief struggle in which his car began rolling forward.

Levar Jones was stopped for a seatbelt offense, just as he was getting out of his car to enter a convenience store. Directed to show his license, Jones leaned into his car to get his wallet, only to be shot four times by the “fearful” officer. Jones was also unarmed.
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MH-17 Shootdown After One Year: What Do We Know?

Jul. 30. - The US still claims Russia bears some or all of the responsibility for the shootdown of Malaysian Airlines flight MH-17 last July, however the Obama Administration still has not released any information to back its claims. Yesterday a resolution to set up a UN tribunal to investigate the crash was vetoed by Russia, which prompted the US to again suggest that Russia was behind the attack. What do we know and what should we know now that a whole year has passed since the tragedy? The Liberty Report discusses the issue with former CIA officer Phil Giraldi:



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A Peace and Prosperity Blog


Obama's Kenya Debacle Shows Folly of Interventionism
Every time US officials try to lecture foreign leaders about what their social policies should be, resentment is created. Far from following the dictates of Washington, often the endless hectoring turns foreign leaders and citizens against the US. Even if the policies urged on by Washington were sound, they would be rejected due to this resentment. Today's Liberty Report takes a look at President Obama's recent trip to Kenya, where he lectured the president on homosexuality and women's issues. Also we step back to look at just why it is that this approach is counterproductive from a pragmatic standpoint...
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Breaking: Daniel McAdams on Russia Veto of MH17 Tribunal Proposal at UNSC
RPI Executive Director Daniel McAdams was interviewed on RT as Russia vetoed a UN resolution to set up a tribunal to look into the downing of Malaysian airlines flight MH-17. Co-drafted by Ukraine, which is one of the suspects in the crime, McAdams points out that such a situation must be unique in criminal history. US ambassador to the UN Samantha Power accused Russia of "trying to deny justice" by vetoing the resolution. That may be true, said McAdams, but why does the United States with its unparalleled intelligence gathering capabilities, refuse to release a full Intelligence Community Assessment of what the US knows about the shoot-down?
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US Escalation: A No-Fly Zone in Syria?
According to recent press reports, the US and Turkey have agreed to carve out a piece of Syria for a "no-fly" zone where the Syrian government cannot bomb ISIS or the US-backed insurgents. Meanwhile, Turkey has been bombing the Kurds in the region, who are known as the real "boots on the ground" against ISIS. A "no-fly" zone in Syria will require a massive US bombing campaign against the Syrian government -- the kind of bombing that was soundly rejected by the American people in 2013. Will they get away with it this time? Tune in to the Ron Paul Liberty Report for the scoop...
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Ron Paul: Look to Switzerland for Path toward Peace
Former US presidential candidate and House of Representatives member Ron Paul says people seeking to advance peace can learn much from looking to Switzerland.
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Video: TSA Supervisor Threatens Young Man Filming the Patdown Of His Father
We have yet another case of a police or security officer threatening a citizen for recording an encounter. The videotape below was taken by a young man who filmed the putdown of his father at the New Orleans airport. The supervisor warns the young man that he will be arrested for filming the public scene.
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